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administration running education programs for after being chancellor the university of colorado boulder people said was the first woman to be a the stage at a research university. i had a fight with ronald reagan even though i was a commissioner one of my latino women was the only other minority we would dissent when they would try to do something that was terrible. we had a big fight with him but i went to all of those. >>host: but president carter appointed you? >> yes. then there is a new department of education and i went back to teaching and that i was appointed. >>host: when did the clear it would be a permanent agency? >>guest: after the first year. the commission was set of sitting down to say we will just served, they did some hearings. the major power the commission has, when it does what it is supposed to do, it will listen to people and civil rights problems that they could not get anyone to pay attention. the federal government. nobody would pay attention. the first year they would go out and listen to the people. they have the power to subpoena any one. eisenhower said i want to
world employing tens of thousands of less educated workers. a wonderful recipe for short-run productivity, a wonderful recipe for paying worker $5 a day. it was factories like this that made detroit quite possibly the most productive place on the planet in the '50s, but these were not a recipe for long-run urban regeneration because they don't need the city, they don't give to the city. they're a world unto themselves. when conditions change, and they always change, you just move the factories to places where it's cheaper. you have nothing left. and so as transportation costs declined, we moved these factories to lower cost locale, we moved them to the suburbs, we moved them to the right-to-work states and across the country. now, detroit still has not recovered from deindustrialization. in part, detroit had the worst of all possible worlds, it had a single large industry, a few dominant firms. those firms crowded out all local entrepreneurship, and the city has had a significant degree of problems ever since. they have 25% -- they've lost 25% of their population between
't do anything useful just like a newborn is limited in skill, without an education or supporting the paradigm for a i, artificial intelligence, to educate them. >> host: can you elaborate on what the neocortex is as opposed to the brain? >> guest: the old brain and the new brain. the new brain is the neocortex. only mammals have the neocortex. these early mammals emerged over 1 hundred million years ago, the neocortex is the size of a postage stamp and is basically the outer layer, neocortex means new rind, of the brain and capable of thinking in a hierarchical fashion. >> host: that is the part of the brain you are focusing on. >> caller: -- >> guest: it has complexity 2. twenty-nine and change quickly they were able to adapt. that was not so much an advantage because the environment did not change quickly. it is the normal process of biological evolution, changing behavior over thousands of generations. it is good enough for non medallion species until the cretaceous extinction event sixty-five million years ago. we see geological evidence of it everywhere in the world, somethi
of scholarship and education, disseminate ears of scientific discovery, and champions of literature. however one defines knowledge economy today it could not have emerged, is not worth sustaining without the production and distribution of books, journals and other professional content. it goes without saying that wherever there is publishing there's copyright. senator keating called copyright the jugular of the book publishing industry. when maria said that earlier this year, i thought i have got to use that, a tribute that to her. and i certainly would not do otherwise. but it seems to me to sum up very much what i have heard since i walked into this position three years ago. there are a lot of publishers who care a lot more about making books than they do about making money. but given the structure of the industry there has to be return. one of the big six did say to me i gamble with other people's money. that is particularly true of the trade sector, the consumer sector where every book is different and you don't know what is going to work and what is not but it also applies to some extent to
was not to convert them, but to educate them. and to improve their lives and tangible ways because that's what they responded to positively. once he had the inside, he had what became the greatest university of her release. >> isn't still open? >> it is. it weathered many tech theories, but it remains open and stay that way. >> who owns it, who rents it? >> it is still run by a very impressive faculty of professors and administrators who are middle easterners and american. daniel liss and peter gorman who is a psychologist by training and shared with the important departments at the university of chicago before he took the shot of a couple years ago. >> is it coincidental uses direct consignment was that on purpose? >> he has a personal passion for the school because of his family connections. >> i can come in the american university, or who runs the? >> faculty air missile easterners. the vast majority of students. >> is it associated with religion, another school? >> is deliberately secular nonsectarian. >> what does it cost to go their four-year? >> i have no idea. >> what would it cost and
different paths in this country. for the college-educated we have a new model of marriage i call the see-saw marriage. this example is the obamas. they have a classic see-saw marriage where the men and women take turns being the family's main provider over the course of the marriage and this has led to a happy stable marriages, very low divorce rate among the college-educated, very long-lasting marriages, low likelihood of raising children alone. michele obama was a health care executive making a lot of money and barack obama was in law school doing public service and they have switched places where he is the main guy and she is the supporter and this is a pretty common pattern of marriage among the college-educated and it has proved to be a stable, good model where as for everybody else in america for the 70% of americans who don't have a college degree marriage is disappearing. people are not getting married. if they are getting married they have high divorce rate and rates of single motherhood are astronomical. it is largely because women are doing everything and the men are dropping
, we need stem education, and, absolutely, i think we do, but we shouldn't underestimate this sense of practical skill that are often passed down from generation, the people of fire who actually are doing things on the factory floor that account for a lot of globe's most successful innovation when it comes to fire suits. one of the pieces, as i said, is that our democratic culture in the business world gives us this competitive advantage of o more authoritarian manufacturing structure, particularly small and medium sized businesses because that allows them to economize production, and that allows them to customize products. the second thesis in the book is tracing a support of manufacturing back in american history, and the idea there's always been a role for government support of private industry. going all the way back to alexander hamilton. i tell people you don't have to read the "world the flat" to understand what we have to do in a global competitive world. read alexander ham hamilton's rt on manufacturing, ten pages, and me makes the argument. he says in a world where we are
. describe the whole sense in education program. >> was that experience like? >> well, it is such an emotional , thrilling to more rewarding experience, both for my wife and i to teach these young men and some of them older, people who have committed heinous crimes, murder, what have you. they see the error of their ways and turn things around. that education process as well as the minister program is extremely important. a major name of one sort. warren buffett was there a few years ago because his sister, as a matter of fact, is a major supporter of hudson, the nonprofit organization. the year to this graduation ceremony and it's just incredible. opening and closing prayers. the old bible or what have you. they always have a valedictorian get up representing the graduates. usually maybe 20, 30 students who are graduating in ssc it's our best agree. and the valedictorian gets up and says, you know, i started off my parents own mother, the great hopes for me. then i got in the wrong crowd. i got into drugs are what have you. and then he says, and then i killed a man. a
are holding onto as we compete globally and how well we have done educating the people to take their place in the economy, and i would hope that whatever agenda comes forward we have an agenda that is deeply, deeply focused on adult learning, and of education, community colleges and finding more ways for people to constructively enter the economy. >> counselor? >> i would concur on those points. i'm grateful i live in a state that has a governor deval patrick and living in a country with president barack obama. one of the reasons you just stated in creating better access to both educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating all of those other disparities. it's important we not upset about the 99% of the 47% and just remember that there are people behind all of those percentages, and people that has been struggling and people living in poverty. if you talk about the shrinking middle class, who were the joining? and so i want a president and governor and a major that believes in making those critical investment in physical infrastructure and in people that support the rule t
and education education, disseminate ears of scientific discovery, champions of literature. however one defines knowledge today but could not have the merged and is not worth sustaining without the distribution of books and journals and other professional content. it goes without saying that wherever there is publishing there is copyright. senator keating was called at the jugular of the industry. quote when maria said that earlier this year i thought i have to attribute that to her and i would not do otherwise. [laughter] but it seemed to sum up what i have heard since i walked into this position three years ago. publishers some care more about making books and making money but there has to be returned. one of the big ceos said i gamble with other people's money. that is true of the consumer sector where you don't know what will work and rabat but it doesn't fly to the educational sector. everybody in the industry cares about copyright but there is enormous differences in between what goes on in the cage wealth market. that is very different where sales are made to individual students on the r
in indelible inc.. a blueprint for an america of continental red, network transportation, widespread education and industrial might. at the same time these 12 terrible months revealed the dreadful cost of entry into that future. payable in blood and misery on battlefields from shiloh sharpsburg, do you bridge to fredericksburg. most of all though, 1862 was the year lincoln rose to greatness. never since the founding of the country has so much depended on the judgment, the cunning, the timing and the sheer physical endurance of one man. now how lincoln survived and ultimately triumphed through 1862 is a very good story but it takes a whole book to tell. tonight i would like to talk for a few minutes with you about why lincoln poured everything he had into the struggle. why was it so important to him to save the union? why fight a war that cost more american lives than all of our other wars put together? three-quarters of a million people dead and countless more wounded in body and in mind. to understand this story, i must take you back another 50 plus years before 1862, to a winter day in febru
not fit the progress is a view of educated elite. and by their definitions, were close to quote life unworthy of life, unquote. but these trends would marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continued spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, even literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony of this time, american movies followed a production code that emphasized universal american themes of patriotism. god, fair play, and they avoided sensationalism, sexual situations and other taboo vices. american movies sold american exceptionalism, including quote puritanical moralism as one observer put it. they occasionally make fun of those values to the work of people such as buster keaton and charlie chaplin, but this was all done tongue-in-cheek and never meant to totally undermine the system itself. my 1930, the u.s. had 18,000 movie houses, and compared to france's 2400, and britain's 3000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood, and as long as hollywood sold american exceptionalism, europeans wanted to be like
. and was much better educated and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there was nothing this woman could not do too late linoleum or explain mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child she would handle the affairs at the milk while skinner was in england and ran the boarding house. and was intimately involved in her husband's business but she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there is no economic reason for her to absorber these responsibilities. she took them on. but lizzy was a partner for the first wife died young. but she had raised the children as her own and given birth to age more and of the 10 children seveners still living and all were thriving. and with smart educated young women. but studying french with nine other than george to would be the prime minister of france. going one step further and nina went to college was up in poughkeepsie new york. the oldest, will, 17 was about to close out high-school at the prestigious seminary in east hampton and massachusetts. graduation was a few weeks away if he could make it without being expelled. he is c
in a position of accepting really unacceptable risks to our security, title 1 programs of education for low-income children will be cut dramatically, most people, including the congressional budget office, our own congressional budget office, say that the combination of tax increases along with the decreased spending required under the budget control act will push our economy back into recession in the new year. so i don't agree that no deal is better than a bad deal. in this case, i repeat, no deal is the worst deal because it allows our country to go over the fiscal cliff and really hurts almost every american family in our country, in our economy, as a whole. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. it's not as if, if i could use the metaphor, that congress was going along in a bus and -- on a ride through the country and suddenly came to the end of the road and there was a cliff. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. we -- we -- we created this cliff ourselves a year and a half ago when we adopted the budget control act. and we created it for a very good reason: because we knew that we had pro
and that kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, few traditionally-fit to learn -- nutritionally-fit to learn, materially ready to learn. and that's the lie, or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and they say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to our flag, that that phrase, "liberty and justice for all," should be a command, should be a compelling aspiration, and there should be a conscious conviction amongst us to make that real. but right now we are lacking that sense of urgency, and we can't sit around and wait for elected leaders to do it. when i think about great movements in america, i don't really think they were led by elected officials. elected officials were often responding to the pressure or responding to the leadership on the ground, and that's really what we should be doing. when we're thub voting, conversations, debates, how can we have an entire presidential debate, and it seems that the word "poverty
. the degree to which the library is a model of educating young people is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the energy that drive it to be candid the fundraising ability that john brings to this. john, thank you for your work and thank you for the introduction. [applause] i hope all of you will join calista and me in keeping mrs. rage anyone your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime working for this country. we cherish role while she continues to play a role here in the library. i couldn't come here without mentioning nancy for a minute. governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from you being mayor in san diego, to u.s. senator and leader in a variety of ways. i look to them as great people who represent a willingness to serve their state and country. an important way, and i want to say it's a family engagement out there. thank you both for serving the country. it makes a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i didn't know you would be with us. we're thrilled to have you here tonight. we have launched wha
to be assigned, but he also wanted to exposes them to a european education into the world of international affairs in the world of diplomacy. and they went to sea with benjamin franklin and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside paris at the time and john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. within several, he was speaking french folly. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15 he could speak four languages fought late, had rd studied latin and greek. he was so gifted in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really vent
started out as an easiest, then became a collector and then became an educator to her website called raglan in.com and ultimately through this book. the story how i first discovered historic newspapers have been about five years ago. at least when i took her first family vacation to illinois, a cozy mississippi river town, were on the main strip every discovered they were bookshop and in that rare book shop i found this nondescript container full of old newspapers, picked one up and started reading it and it april 21st 1865 near times. i was reading abraham lincoln assess the nation every word for the capture of his conspirators. that moment triggered in me an intense passion and enthusiasm for history that i previously had never had. so for the next five years, it became this journey of meticulous collecting a newspapers because i'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient access to a lot of the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access to a lot of the originals found in the libraries and institutions across the country. so i made it a point to collect the
goals -- political goals and i did a biographee of brian lamb with educators on c-span and people kept saying what is the real brian lamb like and he didn't want a biography done. and i finally got a contract and i came in and said well, and you know, where do you think and he said i guess i would let you and i can't say no on the station committed to open access to information how can i close things down. so it didn't interfere, kind of opened the village, gave me a list of high school friends said that was kind of fun to do. prior to that, a book that looked at individuals that changed national policies and as those that created major legislation because of their action to read estimate what do you teach at the naval academy? >> political science. the last 40 years we've almost always been the number one people don't assume that in a technical school we say we are the value added major because they get their technical education plus to get the social science education that i teach media and politics and courses in the congress and campaigns and the elections and i keep my finger in t
involved in another political campaign. but it talks about health care, education, the policy of capital punishment, which regardless of your philosophy isn't working. getting into responsible criminal-justice issues and rehabilitation, that sort of thing. i even recommended going on the metric system which is certainly something else and you said i'm running for vice president with governor gary johnson. it's amazing because she from a totally different perspective has come out to pretty much the same analysis that i have on all these important issues like education. today the talk you were wearing, and i like it by the way, deutsch shows how much to spend, where to go, what to buy. like all other consumer goods that is how we get reasonable bids for reasonable prices that education is completely different than that. it is funded from the top up so the federal government thinks of this money keeps a bunch of it and gives it to the state and keep a bunch of it for their administrative costs and give it to the school districts, give it to the schools, the use a lot of administrative costs
mother and father through months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond hill georgia and the surroundisurroundi ng areas welcomes matthew home with tears, flags and staff salute. the streets were lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing it has memorial service at the methodist church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout, a local boy scout troop honored him by collecting pens and papers and sending them to mattheus unit map these unit in afghanistan. a dear friend who was involved in the media had a fission and the project began. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film on memorial day 2010. since then with the help of so many volunteers, and i can't name them all, that project has sent over seven tons of school supplies to our soldiers and marines in humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthews small town of richmond hill and outlying city of savannah and their great army bases of ft. stewart and hunter army airfield and the savannah aircard have helped me heal by supporting the
, good education, nutritionally fit to learn, material ready to learn, and that's the lie or that's the incompleteness we have to address. when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in affluent neighborhoods, and they say those words, "liberty and justice for all," when they pledge allegiance to the flag, that should be a command, should be a compelling aspiration, and there should be a conscious conviction amongst us to make that real, but right now, we are lacking that sense of or jen ji, and we can't sit around waiting on elected leaders to do it. when i think about elected movements in america, i don't think they were led to elected officials. elected officials respond to the leadership on the ground. that's what we should be doing. when we think about voting conversations to debate, how can we have an entire presidential debate, and seems that the word "poverty" was almost something we shouldn't talk about? something we shouldn't address. i hope we can change the dialogue because i'm a guy who actually likes to do a balance sheet analysis of our country. th
to the education of our children and the health of the market. .. [applause] our coverage of the international summit of the book continues now by a panel called the publishing world yesterday and today. it about one hour 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, ladies and supplement. it's a pleasure see so many of you, so many old friends here. i have a great privilege of being senior consultant for the librarian of congress, and i am also a writer and editor in chief and the world. and also a veteran of the publishing world. i have worked for many years as a senior editor and also at simon & schuster as well. i have been around the block. a bit of a veteran in august. but we have learned so many things in this conference so far. such a delight in such a pleasure to have heard the wonderful keynote speech. the report from the frontline with so many countries like russia and south africa, to learn that the first encounter between europe and the new world, but between the conquistadors and into was over a book. with thomas jefferson and the wondrous discussion register. such a vibrant discussion. it is w
as near to the absolute privacy of the notions regarding abortion, birth control, sex education, sterilization and the rights. in looking at these, we might begin to remind us first visible signals of the change are often the mistaken for the force. the wave which we see first is the most apparent but doesn't impelled the ship, the smoke we see first is the most apparent but it doesn't involve a locomotive. the left similarly seems to be the championship of the various causes however an independent to call for the lowering of the birth rate which is one of the first of the universal signs of the national decline. see also the attendant call from the left for the learning abolition of the requirements for citizenship. the left would say the traditional definition of such art an egregious example of american exceptional some, which is to say arrogance, but we first hour citizens of the world. but citizenship and ply as defined rights and obligations. what rights does an american have on north korea, iran, china, or for that matter indonesia and what rights does an american jew, ga
of educating young people is really remarkable. analog that goes to the energy, and to be candid, the fund-raising ability that john brings us. so, john, thank you for your work. [applause] >> i hope all of you will join close to me in keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she is a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime serving this country. and we all cherish her, as she continues to be active and continues to play a role here at the library. so i couldn't come here, and i mentioned nancy fortissimo their aisles with say, governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from being made in san diego to u.s. senator to governor, to a leader in a variety of ways. i look to pete wilson and to gale as great people who represent the willingness to serve the state and the country in an important way. i want to say, it's always a family engagement if you're out there, thank you both for serving the country but it really does make a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] >> i did not you would be with us, but we are thrilled to have you here. callista and
that invested in our people, invested in the infrastructure, invested in education, and at the same time said we can find cuts in other areas and we can raise taxes on those who are doing very well. and what happened with that fair and balanced approach? what happened was the greatest prosperity in modern history. 23 million jobs, no more deficits, we got to a balanced budget and i remember saying to my husband my goodness, what's going to happen? there won't be any more u.s. government bonds because we're going to be out of the debt situation. we saw -- we saw it on the horizon when george w. bush became president, he decided to go back, backwards on rates across the board from the wealthiest to the middle to the poor, and he put two wars on a credit card and we are where we are where we are. and to add to this history, we all know that we're coming out of the worst recession since the great depression. it has been difficult, led by, unfortunately, some unscrupulous people on wall street who created a nightmare in the housing market. i remember saying to treasury secretary paulsen can you expla
accomplished then from that generation. but a lot of disappointment with what has happened with education and the erosion of opportunity. frankly the decisions that have been made with opportunities and affirmative action and the next wave will be financial to encourage on to print your shipping give people the tools to start their own businesses and inspire the same generation of leaders. but also to the holy cross community one day in the process has reinforced is a strong fraternity and power the school has had with the highest levels of giving. especially canadian. be don't give. but holy cross when i looked at the network, the power of a cross and the way people support each other it is very inspiring and a testament to wear a hat pins and the support shown for father brooks and these men and their appreciation to be pioneers, i hope it is a story we continue to come back to again and again. with the support i
, and that includes social services, education, research and infrastructure, all of the things that we need to grow our fragile economy. the calm act gives the office of management and budget discretion and flexibility to recommend what programs and what agencies and accounts to cut. if o.m.b. fails to do the job, then the sequestration across-the-board cuts kick back n of course the final word rests right here with us in congress. o.m.b.'s decision with be overridden by a joint resolution. every provision of the calm act o the senate. in fact, at one time or another, nearly every feature of this plan has been offered by both republicans and democrats, including president obama and speaker boehner. all i've done is pull them together to offer them has a compassionate alternative to what happens if we go over the fiscal cliff. true, from the very beginning i have favored a comprehensive solution to put our fiscal house in orderings something along the lines of the simpson-bowles. we don't have that luxury right now. but perhaps it will only soften the blow of the fiscal cliff but also give us a sens
house" which lays out a radical vision of education in the future of america, and the marriage of traditional classroom and digital technology, employing them in a way that flips our traditional model of education. >> by the way, carn appeared on our afterwards program so if you want to watch that author, type in his name. long history between 12 and christopher hitchens. >> long history. we published christopher, "god is not great" in 2007. a number one "new york times" best seller. after that book we published his first memoir, followed last september by an essay collection called "arguably." also went on to be a best seller, but together under extreme circumstances. he was very ill at the time. we hoped to publish a book -- a long are -- longer book about his illness but we corrected the article for vanity fair. >> you're going to be at the miami book fair next week, november 17th, 18th, along with carol blue, and martin amos. >> that's going to be a really interesting panel to be on. martin and christopher knew each other for a very long time. carol and martin are very clos
jennings when i was director of education at james madison's month peelier in virginia. i was familiar with jennings' memoir considered by the white house historical association to be the first memoir of life in the white house. it was titled "a colored man's rem innocences of james madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements of his own biography to uncover the circumstances behind the original publication of the memoir in 1865 and to find an interview living direct descendents. a slave in the white house, paul jennings and the madisons is the story of paul jennings' unique journey from slavery to freedom. it played out in the highest circles of ideas and power. the white house, james madison's study. it's the story of paul jennings' complicated relationship with the father of the constitution, james madison. jennings was the constant servant in james madison's study, and as madison would discuss political subjects of the day, and during his reti
education in the 1920s was in general thought to be pursuing that for her own personal betterment, and not for the purpose of having a career. was to become a better life, a better homemaker, a better mother in the future. that was the object of post secondary education, primarily. women did go into the teaching profession, and so carson certainly could've been a teacher. she could've taught biology, or writing eventually for that matter. that would've been a career avenue that would've been open to a. science was also more open to women than other disciplines were. the marine biological laboratory at, was a place where a lot of prominent women scientists study. one of carson's predecessors was another person who went on to actually become a writer, gertrude stein spent a couple of summers studying marine biology, which i find kind of interesting. but yes, carson's prospects would've a very circumscribed by the fact that she was a woman. i was talking order today with someone about her role and whether there was something that was gender oriented about the fact that she was really
for not contributing to their education. whereupon the jailer and wife made several racist comments, you know, about why would you want to try to educate these monkeys anyway? this became part of the tension, but the little girls #w-r put into a different category, and then there was, later on, a very big battle over who should be their proper -- who should be in charge of their lives basically, and were removed from the household of the jailer, and then then lived with an abolitionist close to the african himself. >> [inaudible] >> the question was did they go back to sierra leone? yes, they did. all three little girls remained with the mission for many years, and, right there, she actually came back to the united states and became, i do believe, the first black female graduate of overland college. then went back to sierra leone as a missionary herself. most found their families and did what they wanted to do when they got back. they wanted to go back to their lives. there's a continue -- a tragic point for sinke when searching for his wife and children, he found the village was completely destroye
the supreme court decision in the brown v. board of education decision 1954. strom thurmond is a recordholder to this day of the longest one man filibuster. and again his work pashtun and the guinness book of world records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was. he was that. he was one of the last jim crow demagogue. what we forget about thurmond is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? what's a sun belt conservative? the sun belt, it's one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. and that is the flow of jobs, of industry, of resources and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war ii period. the southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united stat
education but preparing himself for a life to be a doctor like his two parents had been. to a chapter which is one of my favorites called "plato and socrates" which describes the relationship between he and paul in its saw, it enabled him, i think, to navigate the political rivers that he would have to cross. and he learned some techniques of breaking down, to be more an lettic and to think critically about issues. it's a remarkable relationship between the two men. and it will, ultimately, cause zumwalt some problems with his boss, admiral tom moore. because tom moore would soon come to resent the closeness that bud zumwalt had with paul. because oftentimes with respect to vietnam policy, bud was following out about policy before admiral moore would know antibiotic. and this eventually -- about it. and this eventually led moore to come up with this plan. no one had ever heard of any admiral who went off to vietnam at that time. it was sort of like the death knell for admirals. and the navy itself was in the bath water at that time except, of course, for the aviators. i mean, the glory was
was educated at yale university and yale law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the awful immediacy of his war experiences made him a man who was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of war, he worked as "newsweek" magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr. who asked him to manage the merchandise mart in chicago. during those chicago years, he married the boss' daughter, eunice, in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board and the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city's schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon led to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served as kennedy's chair for illinois and also headed the campaign's civil rights division. in that capacity late in the campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone coret
, and also -- advocating for compulsory education for girls in pakistan who was tried and murdered. i'd like to make that comment. my condolences to your parents, and i love that. i love how you talked about the -- do not have to be -- more than capable of being trained to be able to defend themselves. and, yeah, so peace and love. >> host: matthew. >> guest: i appreciate that. i should also tell you that so many, matthew, of the people that got -- when we started writing "heros for my son" and i went on facebook or twitter and said please send me other heros and so many people have send me heroes. in fact one of the last heros in the book is a woman named will ma rude dolph, and i didn't know who she was. she was young girl who had polio, and the doctors said she would never be able to walk, ever, and her mom used to drive back and forth, take a bus for hours and hours trying to get her to doctors appointments, and they said, she'll never walk. final russian when she was a little girl, take herbarieses off, and she starts running, and she starts running faster than anyone. she wins the bron
, broke through the door and captured all men in the pillbox. remarkably the lieutenant was educated in the united states and he said i am ready to surrender. lieutenant edmonds said to him take me to the commander of the fort and that is exactly what he did. with his tongue begun in his side the fabulous four went through the battery, down an elevator, went through an amphitheater that looked like a football field and they went into the depths of the guns of navarrone type situation. and the commanding officer's office and he decided to break through the door and the commanding officer gave him -- what you want? we would like you to surrender the 4 ridge. the commanding officer's -- he was incredulous. you are only four men. he picked up the telephone and said you are my prisoner. at that point, robert edmond had one of the greatest bluffs of world war ii, pull out a hand grenade and put it between his legs and said you are going to surrender. at that point, eight hundred men surrendered after rebroadcast that over the loudspeaker. incredible story of world war ii that is completely
legitimate and getting an education and making sure that your relationships, people were legitimately married. anything that pointed back words or made you illegitimate was not really something they wanted to talk about and have out there. it is too bad because it closed a lot of doors in our family and that is what you found in michele obama's family. very fortunate, you were able to help and truly open those doors for her family. >> at least with been -- within her family, there are those conversations happening. as i said americans, ordinary americans across the country are making these discoveries with dna testing so these conversations are happening around the country. when you talk about marriage and the importance of legitimacy, one of the other stories which talks about the variations of the american experience during slavery was the first lady's family had ancestors who were freed for decades before the civil war and one of the most interesting records i came across was a record which showed those members of her family who after the civil war went to the courthouse and lined up to ge
board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but we have a big sweep because we could couple this with the showtime documentary to make it more dramatic. >> just like a basic text history 101. these books are not coherent. there is no pattern. we don't understand how that works. to some degree the united states always comes out ahead or okay. >> if you take if the chinese history. >> to see it through the other rise in? >> but he said with gap what we said looks to the russians obamacare has some of that ability. >> talk about obama. your chapter is entitled provocatively. [laughter] in some ways they've made it worse. >> the longest chapter of the book. >> it might get longer. >> then i see the cuts that we have to make but to deal with a contemporary is a lot of interest in obama. then to pull back. >> but there were people on the right to and those who would disagree to say he apologizes for america and pulls out from the allies and those that say he should not send t
in a community afflicted by and foreclosures. those children show their scars in their educational development of personal development and emotional development for years to come. every time i hear some conservative politician explain why we have not got the resources to do something about unemployment, another one of these economic downturns of capitalism to lyle was scratched my head because even the most conservative calculation would indicate that the cost of not doing something is larger. ought to have been undertaken long ago. just as in this case, the most stunning thing if you are a normal thinking person would be to ask yourself, the last time we had a crisis like this, the last time capitalisms and stability took this terrible turn in the 1930's something very different happened then is happening now. major steps were taken by a democratic president's, middle of the rover, mr. obama, everything changed and he wasn't a big middle of the road. he became something else and a lot of things for the people. none of those are being done now that is a remarkable difference in the way you han
think of all. though my lack of education has a hurting on, i could read the writing on the wall. kodachrome gave us a nice bright colors command makes you think the world of sunny day. i've got a nikon camera. i love to take photographs. so mama, don't take my kodachrome away. [laughter] >> i'm glad you mentioned it. my essay in the book really tells the back story of the manbo families, by the open with paul simon's kodachrome. i open with that very lyric. because what i say is kodachrome does make you think all the world is a sunny day. but what if the story really isn't so sunny and that's the central problem in the central challenge and the sensual delight of these color photographs. adiabatic adding a mac >> is a very preset of observation. so billy was four when he left camp. he doesn't remember any of this. he had very fleeting memories. his family as was common among japanese american families, his parents never taught about this episode at all within. so he has no memories of this. he has no evidence dearness. he remembers going around looking for rocks with his grandmo
good education. i was on the screen for 15 seconds it took about about half a day and that's not including the time i spent in costume and makeup. the effort that goes into making movies and television drama is just terrific. i was lucky around the senate and i thought it was him for weaving. this is just a prop, didn't appear in the story. but it was a 12th century limb. not a change century by century, a technology by developed and i happen to know this is not an 11th century loom or 13. it was the 12th. there might be six people know what to know that, but someone working on the film do it and got that exactly right. that kind of thing is very impressive. >> are you tempted to be in any more of these things? >> i like the clamor. it is a privilege to work with one of the stars and i felt honored and i learned about. i i learned, for example, that she can't act if you're trying to remember your lines because then you say your lines with outlook on your face, what comes. if you're going to ask in a 152nd book you have to know your lines automatically. i do know that before
. people can go to her digital archives now uncertain. on the educational portion of our website, we have a whole website where they come to life and you get to do activities on him. you can actually come to our research room. some people still come to our research room. >> so the word accessible does come to mind? >> absolutely. >> by the way, you should really appreciate what this guy did. anybody who has ever had to work with research materials, above all tape recordings of offers conversations of any kind, maybe has appreciation of what horrible drudgery it is to go through this. on behalf of history, ted, thank you very much for all you have done. i want you to explain something more about the system. particularly the way it was set up in the cabinet room, the oval office, at least. at least one telephone. describe it. there was a switch in the knee part of the desk. >> i will answer your question. but like answer your question. the lifetime, also like to intimate my thanks to this great library for what it has done. the library could not have been more supportive at every level, beg
. in retrospect i wish we had done more. education is one that does not get covered nearly in the depth that it should be. that are always struggles to try to cover some of those stories. some of which are difficult, are better in print. >> how much pressure is there today to do entertainment as news? you know, lindsay lohan leading into the evening news or the superficiality of news. a lot of people's opinion of journalism has gone down in recent decades. is there a pressure for a president to kind of how much, what's the news versus entertainment quote a? >> sure. the first sort until in the book was a disagreement about the princess diana coverage why would you a primetime special after she died and peter thought it was a terrible mistake. he quickly came it and decided it was the right thing to do, but that was a constant battle i had within myself and we had within the newsroom or even in the company. that line has moved. it was interesting reading your cronkite book. those issues have been around from the beginning of television, even radio. even walter cronkite did some things th
a second wind and this was in the education of general david petraeus by paula broadwell. any comments on those books? >> it is funny refer to that book as a poorly amid this title about a second wind because after general david petraeus administration, that is exactly why her book got the second wind and why the paperback publication was pushed up. what it has done a little bit though is take away from the larger aspect of these books. when scandal rears its head, one focus is too much on that instead of the substance of the book. one thing worth pointing out especially in relation to the mark cohen and mark cohen was a pseudonym for one of the navy seals who was involved in the mission to kill osama bin laden, the book's publisher which is penguin press, they announced with only weeks to spare, i felt they did a very brilliant job of marketing that book. it didn't help or perhaps didn't hurt depending on who you ask that mark owens's real name was dutifully revealed by the media which than cost its own fire storm and the like but the upshot is many of these books with commensurate mi
this other thing that we haven't even thought about. i feel like there could he and education, sort of guide to how we would put recruitment strategies or how to use them as a tool in other fields? >> i think you're absolutely right in that is why had done this thing up diving. i've been involved with politics since i was 16 and i go juan iranian television and they go on saudi television discussing world affairs. i also do american television on a radio station talking about world affairs. why? these things are all related. mass behavior among parts having relationship to mass behavior among human beings doesn't make that massive behavior predictable because the mass of behavior builds behavior considerably. it builds on repulsion but in recognizing the commonalities lies a hint of the solution and if you read my first book the lucifer principle, the forces of history, you will see ideas like this applied in ways that relate directly to geopolitics and to economics and if you read my second book global brain, the office from the secretary of defense thought that book was so relevant to thes
have read of the book. [inaudible] equipment of an education. schooling, anything at all, anything outside the koran is -- [inaudible] it is very easy to mobilize the youth who sit at the feet of the moon law at the schools and to take orders, who believe that [inaudible]. of the cleric in charge. the politics of nigeria became complicated, simply because of something the british did. they were not satisfied. there had to be dissension, division in the sense of the political power in the country. so when the british left, before the left they created -- [inaudible] and naturally they wanted closest to their viable or already practicing a kind of structure, which is close to what the british practice at the time until later in the year. and so they not only falsified the elections that followed, preceded independence. they falsified even consensus. now, if you check the annals of home office, so-called home office, which is where the colonies are ministered, look for the book of harold smith was one of the civil service in nigeria at the time. he was in the white house and he got in
on as complete. so i think they do a great service to educating the public and writers and a free but he also not the court. >> i share the concern about the future of the records that will be available from the justices and their papers. i asked once about what the justices are doing with their e-mail. is there any regime for saving e-mail and i was told no there isn't much of a role. they still -- most of the communications on paper, but there is no rule about the e-mail and the justice peepers are not governed, are not viewed as public documents in the same way the presidential papers are. .. >> you know, the brother and was published in 1979. there wasn't really a behind-the-scenes book about the supreme court, [inaudible] between 1979 and 2010. when i wrote my other book. i think there is some generational change that has gone on record. i think that the justices were on the court, they really were of a different generation where the press was not a major factor in their thinking. you now have several justices in their 50s who grew up in a different environment. i'm not saying that they
-who has a remarkable gift with difficult children. she not only has her phd and special education, but she is a traditional disciplinary and, upchuck love. so she stripped down and she wants to sit down with the kids one at a time. so she sits down with child number one, the 10-year-old. and she has her ruler in her hand, and she said gently, just as a conversation, the simplest question she can think of. sun, where it god and little boys that they are and doesn't say a word. so she gets a little less patient, and she says little bit more sternly, sun, where is god? and the little child still doesn't answer. so she taps her palm with a steel ruler and comes out with that kind of control that has taken the command as kids from the south bronx to compton, california, and she says, son, i am asking you, where is god? and he runs away and hides in a closet. so this is the closet where they usually plan the next thing that they are going to do. the older kid is trembling. and he says, we are in really big trouble this time. god is missing. and they think that we did it. [laughter] arai, that is
molecular biology for a master's, but it's clear that he is scientific education did not go in vain. when i got my copy i went to the chapter that i would be able to judge vest on the energy environment or chapter 5 conservation and clean energy chaos. i happen to love the liberation myself, so i got a freebie in that title and i was pleased to see the tape on the creasy aspects of the environmental policy favored by progressives from those that don't work to ruechel or heads that his attitude and don't get you clean. and they pointed out some points about water conservation where if you were worried about water conservation you wouldn't be looking at the shower heads and toilets because most of the water that is used as industrial for energy use and irrigation and so forth and you have to get all the way down to the 1% level when you talk about the consumer use of water that he would be trying to knock that down by a percentage or so by going to the smaller toilets and showers. so i am hoping that one of the things that we also discuss is one of my pet peeves which is the willingness of pr
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